Category Archives: Pet First Aid

Slight update to your FAW book.

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Slight change to your recent book if you attended a  First Aid at Work (FAW) course with me in the last 12 months

AED Data Collection

The Resuscitation Council (UK) no longer supplies or collects the AED event form that has been in use. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains an important priority for the Resuscitation Council (UK) and it has established a national out-of-hospital database with the British Heart Foundation and Association of Ambulance Medical Directors, in partnership with the University of Warwick. This audit also captures the events where a public access AED has been used before the arrival of the ambulance crew via a reusable and easily accessible new online event form. To that end, there is a requirement to reflect this information within the suite of Highfield First Aid books.

The required changes are below.

Page 7

The book states the following:

‘In cases where a defibrillator has been used, regardless of whether shocks were given or not, then the Event Report Form (ERF) requires completing in full and the white copy to be sent to the Resuscitation Council (UK) as soon as possible. The address of which can be found at the bottom of the form.’

This paragraph requires removing and the following inserted:

‘In cases where a public access AED has been used, dependent on local authority policies, there may be a requirement to report the event using a prescribed audit reporting chain’


Thank you



British Standard First Aid Kit

Child First Aid

Here is the law as revised recently in relation to First Aid Kits.

Health & Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981 (revised 2013).

“An employer shall provide or ensure that there are provided such equipment and facilities as are adequate and appropriate in the circumstances for enabling first aid to be rendered to his employees if they are injured or become ill at work.”

You have a choice when it comes to kits. You can buy an expensive kit to BS8599 standards or you can have a kit that meets the minimum that the HSE recommend. It is your choice.

Your kits must be based on your ‘First Aid Needs Assessment’

How to make sure you meet the new BS8599-1 Standard…

  1.  Undertake a First Aid needs assessment:

LOW RISK (e.g. shops, offices, libraries etc.)

HIGH RISK (e.g. light engineering and assembly work, food processing, warehousing, extensive work with dangerous machinery or sharp instruments, construction, chemical manufacture etc).


  1.  Based on risk, choose the appropriate British Standard First Aid Kit:


LOW RISK   Less than 25 employees

HIGH RISK   Less than 5 employees


LOW RISK   25-100 employees

HIGH RISK   5-25 employees


LOW RISK     1 Large Kit per 100 employees

HIGH RISK     1 Large Kit per 25 employees

Remember Its your choice on the type of kit.

What does the HSE say?

“Employers may wish to refer to British Standard BS8599 which provides further information on the contents of workplace first aid kits. Whether using a first aid kit complying to BS8599 or an alternative kit, the contents should reflect the outcome of a first aid needs assessment”

Hope this helps


Again you can email me on



Checking First Aid Kits (UK)

Green first kit equipmentWhen ever children and adults are on site and whenever they leave the building on official duties or trips they must have access to a first aid kit. This also relates to solo workers.

There are no set guidelines for checking kits, however it is advisable to check them on a regular basis to ensure they are fully stocked.

Planning frequency depends on use. A review of your accidents over the last twelve months for your first aid needs assessment will tell you how often each box or bag is used and it should highlight the type of accidents you are dealing with. Each box/bag is stocked with items that reflect this audit.

There is a recommended minimum for your kits which is shown on my website This list is also available from the HSE website.

There are two lists:

When checking kits, the contents should be:

  • Within the use by date
  • Still sealed
  • Packaging intact
  • Stocked to match the number of bodies on site
  • Is water available close to the kit?

You can have what ever you want as long as you justify it with evidence from previous incidents.

Remember no pills, creams or potions.

Water needs to be available at all times so wall kits need to be mounted near or in the same room as a sink and portable kits need a small sealed, sterile water bottle. ‘Still’ water bottles with a sports nozzle are ideal but remember it needs to be sterile and sealed. Also if it is a bottle of water it needs a sticker on saying for First Aid or HSE use only.

As a company we check our first aid kits every Monday and record in each kit a completion list on a monthly checklist. Each week a different member of the team checks the kits as each one has additional items as well as the HSE Minimum to meet that area of use. By doing the rotation on staff checks, all staff get familiar with the kits in that room or area.

Each kit has copies of blank accident forms and Patient report forms as well as the monthly check tick sheet. We also have a monthly treatment spreadsheet for minor injuries where wipes or plasters are used and don’t need a full accident form. On playground duties this spreadsheet will be daily and must be stored in a folder in the office. The only people to access this should be recognized first aiders.

As a busy first aid company we check fixed wall kits weekly and our portable kits daily.

If you have mobile kits used everyday on playground duties then these should be checked daily and a small amount of regular used stock need to held on site. Don’t hoard dressings as they usually only have a short 3 to 4 year shelf life.

If you are a venue that does not have many incidents the minimum really should be monthly.

I have not mentioned the BS8599-1 kits here and will cover this in my next update.

Hope this helps.

Email me on for any information you need.


Choking for Infants update

Screen Shot 2014-04-17 at 11.58.18Those of you with the Paediatric first aid book from my courses here is an update for you.

Addendum for Paediatric First Aid Handbook January 2014 edition.

Treating a choking infant

Highfield has amended its Paediatric First Aid Handbook and PowerPoint to reflect current accepted best practices with regard to administering back blows to a choking infant. It is now accepted as best practice that the first aider should be in a seated or kneeling position and the infant placed face down along the thigh.

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P 25 Treating a choking infant  (Second bullet point)

Current text:

Place the infant in a downward facing position with the infant’s head at the lowest point. Support the infant’s head by making a cradle with your fingers and thumb of one hand supporting the infant’s lower jaw. The palm of the hand supports the infant’s chest

and the trailing arm supports the infants’ body.

New text:

Place the infant face down along the thigh, with the infant’s head at the lowest point. Support the infant’s head by making a cradle with your fingers and thumb of one hand supporting the infant’s lower jaw.

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Here is a printout you can put in your book.




Pet First Aid Kit

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I am happy to announce that our new first aid range is now available to buy from our sales website

To launch the new site we are offering the Pet First Aid Kit at the special price of £7.99 for a limited time.

Watch out for our pet first aid courses we are running later this year.

More items are being added daily.

First Aid Box Contents


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You have a choice when it comes to first aid kits. There are a number of them out there for sale. But which one is the right one for you?

Your first aid needs assessment will determine what size you need and this will then dictate what the contents are.

You can go over the top and purchase a kit that meets to the new BSI standards. Or you can go for the minimum.

The minimum anyone should work to is the following advised by the website:

What should a first-aid box in the workplace contain?

There is no mandatory list of contents for first-aid boxes and HSE does not ‘approve’ or endorse particular products. Deciding what to include should be based on an employer’s assessment of first-aid needs. As a guide, where work activities involve low hazards, a minimum stock of first-aid items might be:

  • 20 individually wrapped sterile plasters (assorted sizes), appropriate to the type of work (you can provide hypoallergenic plasters, if necessary);
  • two sterile eye pads;
  • four individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile;
  • six safety pins;
  • two large, individually wrapped, sterile, unmedicated wound dressings;
  • six medium-sized, individually wrapped, sterile, unmedicated wound dressings;
  • a pair of disposable gloves, see HSE’s free leaflet: Latex and you PDF.

This is only a suggested contents list.

It is recommended that you don’t keep tablets and medicines in the first-aid box.

More advice is given in HSE’s free leaflet: First aid at work: your questions answered.

Remember that where children are there should always be a first aid kit available and staff trained to use it. If out in a car or out for a walk if you look after children you should have a first aid kit (and water if possible) with you.

Check out the HSE website and search for first aid box.

Also a new web store will be available soon selling the contents at reduced prices. watch this space for it.