Category Archives: Stings

Which First Aid Course do I need?

Telephone receiver

A number of students and managers have contacted me recently with regard to the changes coming up in October regarding the Childcare sector.

I have studied the First Aid training requirements and the advice for each sector is below:

Registered Childminder  – Paediatric First Aid – 12 hours In line with the Early Years Foundation Stage Statutory Framework ( EYFS) the Level 3 Paediatric First Aid (PFA) Course covers all topics required by Ofsted.

Nursery or Pre – School  – Paediatric First Aid – 12 hours In line with the Early Years Foundation Stage Statutory Framework ( EYFS) the Level 3 Paediatric First Aid (PFA) 12 Hour course covers all topics required by Ofsted.

Foundation Stage Teachers  – Paediatric First Aid – 12 hours The EYFS requires that at least one person in a school holds a twelve hour certificate in PFA. The EYFS guidance applies to those who deal with 4, 5 and rising 6 year olds.

School Staff Teaching & Support  – Emergency First Aid at Work for Schools Level 2 (EFAWS) – 6 hours In line with the guidance from The Department of Children, Schools and Families, this course is child orientated and suitable for all school staff who support First Aiders.

After School clubs  – Emergency First Aid at Work for Schools Level 2 (EFAWS) – 6 hours

Or

Level 3 Paediatric First Aid (PFA) 12 Hour course.

Ofsted will expect the course to be relevant to the age of the children. If under 5’s are present you need the Paediatric First Aid – 12 hours

Nanny, Au Pair, Babysitter  – Emergency Paediatric First Aid (EPFA) – 6 hours  There is no set minimum that this course should take. Our 6Hr Emergency Paediatric First Aid (EPFA) course meets the needs of the Voluntary part of the Ofsted Childcare Register, which many Nannies are now opting to join.

The general guidance, as I understand it, is if under 5’s are involved then even if the 12 hour course is not a requirement we still recommend it. The guidance from Ofsted regularly highlights the need for the training to be relevant to the age of the child / children being cared for.

First Aid Box Contents Update 15

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1. There is no mandatory list of items to be included in a first-aid container. The decision on what to provide will be influenced by the findings of the first-aid needs assessment. As a guide, where work activities involve low hazards, a minimum stock of first-aid items might be:

  • a leaflet giving general guidance on first aid (for example, HSE’s leaflet Basic advice on first aid at work);
  • 20 individually wrapped sterile plasters (assorted sizes), appropriate to the type of work (hypoallergenic plasters can be provided if necessary);
  • two sterile eye pads;
  • two individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile;
  • six safety pins;
  • two large sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • six medium-sized sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • at least three pairs of disposable gloves (see HSE’s leaflet Latex and you6).

Attached is a Pdf list for the suggested workplace and travel kits.

First Aid Box Contents 15

EFAW Book update

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Slight change to your recent book if you attended a Emergency First Aid at Work(EFAW) course with me in the last 12 months

AED Data Collection

The Resuscitation Council (UK) no longer supplies or collects the AED event form that has been in use. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains an important priority for the Resuscitation Council (UK) and it has established a national out-of-hospital database with the British Heart Foundation and Association of Ambulance Medical Directors, in partnership with the University of Warwick. This audit also captures the events where a public access AED has been used before the arrival of the ambulance crew via a reusable and easily accessible new online event form. To that end, there is a requirement to reflect this information within the suite of Highfield First Aid books.

The required changes are below.

Page 9

The book states the following:

‘In cases where a defibrillator has been used, regardless of whether shocks were given or not, then the Event Report Form (ERF) requires completing in full and the white copy to be sent to the Resuscitation Council (UK) as soon as possible. The address of which can be found at the bottom of the form.’

This paragraph requires removing and the following inserted:

‘In cases where a public access AED has been used, dependent on local authority policies, there may be a requirement to report the event using a prescribed audit reporting chain’

 

Thank you

 

PK

Slight update to your FAW book.

Screen Shot 2015-01-23 at 09.47.14

 

Slight change to your recent book if you attended a  First Aid at Work (FAW) course with me in the last 12 months

AED Data Collection

The Resuscitation Council (UK) no longer supplies or collects the AED event form that has been in use. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains an important priority for the Resuscitation Council (UK) and it has established a national out-of-hospital database with the British Heart Foundation and Association of Ambulance Medical Directors, in partnership with the University of Warwick. This audit also captures the events where a public access AED has been used before the arrival of the ambulance crew via a reusable and easily accessible new online event form. To that end, there is a requirement to reflect this information within the suite of Highfield First Aid books.

The required changes are below.

Page 7

The book states the following:

‘In cases where a defibrillator has been used, regardless of whether shocks were given or not, then the Event Report Form (ERF) requires completing in full and the white copy to be sent to the Resuscitation Council (UK) as soon as possible. The address of which can be found at the bottom of the form.’

This paragraph requires removing and the following inserted:

‘In cases where a public access AED has been used, dependent on local authority policies, there may be a requirement to report the event using a prescribed audit reporting chain’

 

Thank you

 

PK

British Standard First Aid Kit

Child First Aid

Here is the law as revised recently in relation to First Aid Kits.

Health & Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981 (revised 2013).

“An employer shall provide or ensure that there are provided such equipment and facilities as are adequate and appropriate in the circumstances for enabling first aid to be rendered to his employees if they are injured or become ill at work.”

You have a choice when it comes to kits. You can buy an expensive kit to BS8599 standards or you can have a kit that meets the minimum that the HSE recommend. It is your choice.

Your kits must be based on your ‘First Aid Needs Assessment’

How to make sure you meet the new BS8599-1 Standard…

  1.  Undertake a First Aid needs assessment:

LOW RISK (e.g. shops, offices, libraries etc.)

HIGH RISK (e.g. light engineering and assembly work, food processing, warehousing, extensive work with dangerous machinery or sharp instruments, construction, chemical manufacture etc).

 

  1.  Based on risk, choose the appropriate British Standard First Aid Kit:

SMALL KIT USAGE GUIDELINES

LOW RISK   Less than 25 employees

HIGH RISK   Less than 5 employees

MEDIUM KIT USAGE GUIDELINES

LOW RISK   25-100 employees

HIGH RISK   5-25 employees

LARGE KIT USAGE GUIDELINES

LOW RISK     1 Large Kit per 100 employees

HIGH RISK     1 Large Kit per 25 employees

Remember Its your choice on the type of kit.

What does the HSE say?

“Employers may wish to refer to British Standard BS8599 which provides further information on the contents of workplace first aid kits. Whether using a first aid kit complying to BS8599 or an alternative kit, the contents should reflect the outcome of a first aid needs assessment”

Hope this helps

 

Again you can email me on paulkenny@me.com

 

PK

Checking First Aid Kits (UK)

Green first kit equipmentWhen ever children and adults are on site and whenever they leave the building on official duties or trips they must have access to a first aid kit. This also relates to solo workers.

There are no set guidelines for checking kits, however it is advisable to check them on a regular basis to ensure they are fully stocked.

Planning frequency depends on use. A review of your accidents over the last twelve months for your first aid needs assessment will tell you how often each box or bag is used and it should highlight the type of accidents you are dealing with. Each box/bag is stocked with items that reflect this audit.

There is a recommended minimum for your kits which is shown on my website www.paulkenny.me This list is also available from the HSE website.

There are two lists:

When checking kits, the contents should be:

  • Within the use by date
  • Still sealed
  • Packaging intact
  • Stocked to match the number of bodies on site
  • Is water available close to the kit?

You can have what ever you want as long as you justify it with evidence from previous incidents.

Remember no pills, creams or potions.

Water needs to be available at all times so wall kits need to be mounted near or in the same room as a sink and portable kits need a small sealed, sterile water bottle. ‘Still’ water bottles with a sports nozzle are ideal but remember it needs to be sterile and sealed. Also if it is a bottle of water it needs a sticker on saying for First Aid or HSE use only.

As a company we check our first aid kits every Monday and record in each kit a completion list on a monthly checklist. Each week a different member of the team checks the kits as each one has additional items as well as the HSE Minimum to meet that area of use. By doing the rotation on staff checks, all staff get familiar with the kits in that room or area.

Each kit has copies of blank accident forms and Patient report forms as well as the monthly check tick sheet. We also have a monthly treatment spreadsheet for minor injuries where wipes or plasters are used and don’t need a full accident form. On playground duties this spreadsheet will be daily and must be stored in a folder in the office. The only people to access this should be recognized first aiders.

As a busy first aid company we check fixed wall kits weekly and our portable kits daily.

If you have mobile kits used everyday on playground duties then these should be checked daily and a small amount of regular used stock need to held on site. Don’t hoard dressings as they usually only have a short 3 to 4 year shelf life.

If you are a venue that does not have many incidents the minimum really should be monthly.

I have not mentioned the BS8599-1 kits here and will cover this in my next update.

Hope this helps.

Email me on paulkenny@me.com for any information you need.

PK

Myth Busters – Primary school staff asked not to take any drinks onto the playground during breaks

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Here is a case I hear a lot about from teachers.

Case 327 – Primary school staff asked not to take any drinks onto the playground during breaks

Issue

For health and safety reasons staff at a primary school were asked not to take drinks, including cold ones, out onto the playground during breaks to safeguard the children.

Panel decision

This is one of the most extreme cases the panel has dealt with in relation to disproportionate restriction of drinks around children. It relates not only to hot drinks, but includes cold drinks on highly improbable grounds including the possibility of a child suffering an allergic reaction. Occupational health and safety law does not ban teachers from having a cuppa and even less a refreshing cold drink, whilst on playground duty, and to suggest it does is just preposterous. If the head wants to impose ridiculous rules on staff, he/she should not use health and safety as a convenient cover.

Some schools / nurseries have a local policy of not allowing hot drinks onto the playground where small children are, so they issue staff with insulated cups with the school logo printed on them. For areas with small children make sure the lid is screw on not push fit.

 

http://www.hse.gov.uk/myth/myth-busting/