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New ‘gold standard’ in paediatric first aid launched

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A new initiative to help improve paediatric first aid training in early years settings has been launched today by Education and Childcare Minister Sam Gyimah, in memory of a 9-month-old girl who tragically died in 2012.

Millie Thompson passed away after choking on her lunch while at nursery in Stockport. Since her death, Millie’s parents Joanne and Dan have campaigned for a new ‘gold standard’ certificate to be created in recognition of early years childcare providers that train all their staff in paediatric first aid, going above and beyond the minimum legal requirements.

The quality mark – which has been developed by the Department for Education (DfE), National Day Nursery Association (NDNA) and the Thompsons – will be known as ‘Millie’s Mark’ and will help to give parents assurance that every staff member that cares for their child is trained in these important, life-saving skills.

From summer 2016, early years settings in England will be eligible to apply to be accredited with this unique quality mark that will provide parents with the assurance that their child is being cared for by safe and knowledgeable staff. The quality mark will be in addition to the existing statutory requirements for paediatric first aid that all early years providers must meet as a legal requirement.

Alongside the launch of Millie’s Mark, the government has today published a response to the consultation on changing the paediatric first aid requirements in the statutory framework for the early years foundation stage (EYFS). The majority of those who responded were in favour of increasing the number of paediatric first aiders in early years settings.

So, from this September [2016], all newly qualified level 2 and level 3 staff must also have either a full paediatric first aid certificate or an emergency paediatric first aid certificate to count in the required staff to child ratios.

‘So for Nurseries that have trained with us at BUFFS and have the New Level 3 Paediatric first aid certificate you need to read the information below and if you meet all the criteria you can apply’. PK

Millie’s Mark – Paediatric First Aid

NDNA has been awarded a contract to deliver Millie’s Mark, the new quality mark

for nurseries where all employees are trained in paediatric first aid.

Nurseries will be able to apply for Millie’s Mark, which will be awarded as a special endorsement to childcare providers that can meet a set criteria including:

  • Evidence of needs assessment for setting staff
  • Evidence that all staff hold an appropriate in-date PFA (full or emergency) certificate
  • Evidence of classroom-based training for one-day courses.

The awarding of Millie’s Mark will be dependent on all of the criteria being met in addition to the legal requirements as set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) Statutory Framework.

These childcare providers will work to keep these crucial skills in the forefront of their employees’ minds, so that they are competent and ready to act in an emergency situation. 

The aims of Millie’s Mark are to keep children safe and minimise risk and accidents by:

  • Raising standards in paediatric first aid
  • Increasing numbers of first aid-trained staff
  • Increasing competency in applying first aid
  • Enabling staff to respond quickly in emergencies
  • Raising the quality and skills of the early years workforce and helping them with day-to-day first aid issues, such as allergies
  • And providing reassurance to parents.

PANIC ATTACK OR HEART ATTACK? HOW CAN YOU TELL?

You feel “off.” Your chest hurts, your heart starts pounding and you get shaky. Your stomach is queasy and you are lightheaded and feel like you need to sit or lie down. Are you having a heart attack? Or is it a panic attack? In this article we’re covering the differences of heart attack vs panic attack.
According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, a “Panic Attack” is defined as 4 or more of the following symptoms:
Heart palpitations, pounding heart, or accelerated heart rate

Excessive sweating

Trembling or shaking

Sensations of shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, or smothering

Feeling of choking

Chest pain or discomfort

Nausea or abdominal distress

Feeling dizzy, unsteady, lightheaded, or faint

Feelings of unreality or being detached from oneself

Fear of losing control or going crazy

Fear of dying

Numbness or tingling sensations (paresthesias)

Chills or hot flushes

Eerily, a lot of the same symptoms can be associated with a heart attack. Chest pain, sweating, shortness of breath, nausea, lightheadedness, numbness or tingling, and chills or hot flashes, can all be potential signs of a heart attack. So how do you know if it is your heart or your mind?   

Without treatment, a heart attack can ultimately end in sudden cardiac arrest and death, so recognizing the symptoms is crucial. In cases of heart attack, symptoms are usually caused by an on-going condition and typically come on over time. Heart attacks can last minutes, hours, days or even weeks. The difference in chest pain is probably the most significant. While panic attack sufferers typically complain of a pounding, rapid heartbeat, a heart attack is characterized by a feeling of tightness and a crushing sensation. The “tingling” associated with a heart attack is actually more of a shooting pain and numbness on the left side of the body, usually down the left arm, while panic attack tingling can affect all extremities. Additional symptoms such as jaw or back pain have also been reported while someone is having a heart attack, but not during panic attacks.

Panic attacks come on sudden and intense and are usually situational. The symptoms rush the sufferer all at once, peak within about 10 minutes and then subside. While someone suffering a panic attack may have subsequent attacks, they come and go and rarely involve loss of consciousness. Panic attacks can be brought on by the feeling you may be having a heart attack, thereby compounding the situation.    

If you have a combination of the above list of symptoms, see your doctor. Panic attacks can be treated with therapy, and symptoms can sometimesheart attack and panic attack be treated in the short term with medications. If your symptoms are related to cardiovascular issues, your doctor will discuss your options and may suggest lifestyle changes, medications or procedural intervention. In the case of both panic attack and heart attack, finding the cause can improve your quality of life and may, indeed, save your life. Never ignore your feelings when “something just isn’t right”.  
Article taken from http://www.aedsuperstore.com

Study: Amateur CPR in Cardiac Arrest Aids Recovery

People who suffered cardiac arrest and received CPR from a bystander were far more likely to return to work and full function than those who did not get help, according to a new study.

The research underscores the benefit of having bystanders trained in CPR, which these days can entail only chest compressions and be learned in a matter of minutes, said Don Weisman, American Heart Association communications director for Hawaii.

The study, Return to Work in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors, was published May 4 in Circulation, the medical journal of the Heart Association. It tracked the progress of 4,354 patients in Denmark who were employed when they suffered cardiac arrest between 2001 and 2011.
Those who received CPR from a bystander had a 38 percent greater chance of returning to work than those who didn’t. While previous research has shown that cardiopulmonary resuscitation boosts survival rates, this study went further in examining whether survivors returned to a normal life.
“When a bystander performs CPR quickly, it helps ensure enough oxygen is getting to the brain, which can help minimize brain damage and lead to that person being able to return to work,” said the study’s lead author, Kristian Kragholm, a physician and clinical assistant at Aalborg University Hospital in Aalborg, Denmark, and a fellow at the Duke Clinical Research Institute in Durham, N.C.
Cardiac arrest is a sudden malfunction in the heart’s electrical system, which can strike otherwise healthy people at any time and is usually fatal. Victims of cardiac arrest collapse, stop breathing and become unresponsive.
A heart attack, on the other hand, involves blockage of blood flow to the heart. Its victims usually are conscious and complain of symptoms such as pain, tightness or weight on their chest.
“A heart attack is a plumbing problem, and cardiac arrest is an electrical problem,” said Weisman. Bystanders should call 911 in either case and perform CPR if the patient is not responsive, he said.
About 420,000 cardiac arrests occur outside hospitals in the United States each year, and 90 percent of victims die, according to the American Heart Association. CPR can double survival rates, but observers often hesitate to intervene because they don’t know how or are afraid of hurting the victim, the association says.
“CPR today is so easy to learn,” Weisman said. “The Heart Association a couple of years ago came out with new science showing that Hands-Only CPR is the most effective for lay people in saving lives.”
“You don’t have to breathe on the victim, which was always a potential roadblock,” he said. “It’s better to just do the chest compressions. The key is to call 911 first so you can get firefighters, police or ambulance on their way, and they’ll bring a defibrillator.”
In Hawaii, rates of bystander intervention and recovery are lower than the U.S. average, according to Dory Clisham, training manager for American Medical Response in Hawaii. Nationally the survival rate for cardiac arrest is 10.8 percent and rises to 32.5 percent if witnessed by a bystander who calls 911 and provides CPR. The Hawaii rates are 9 percent and 26.4 percent, respectively, she said.
“If somebody just does something, they could save a life,” Clisham said. “If everyone was trained, they could buy time for that individual. When our first responders arrive with the defibrillator, it will make a huge difference on the save rates.”
When a teen or an adult suddenly collapses and stops breathing or moving, observers should call 911 and push hard and fast in the center of the victim’s chest, to the beat of the classic disco song, “Stayin’ Alive,” or at least 100 compressions per minute, Clisham said. For infants and children, the heart association still recommends CPR with compressions and breaths.
The heart association is working with the Hawaii Department of Education in the hope of adding CPR to the Hawaii high school health curriculum. It also offers free training to the community, with the next event scheduled for Wednesday in Kakaako. (See box.)
Most cardiac arrests occur at home, so the first person you are likely to save is going to be a loved one or a friend, Weisman said.
Denmark has pushed hard to boost knowledge of CPR. Since 2006 it has required people getting their driver’s licenses to be certified in basic life support. The decade-long Danish study found that outcomes improved after that.
Altogether, although just 18 percent of cardiac arrest victims in the study survived, 3 out of 4 of those survivors were able to return to work at full pay.
“The interesting thing about this study is that they are able to go back into the community and live normal lives,” Clisham said. “They are neurologically intact.”
SOURCE: THE HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER

Measles

What Is Measles?

Measles is caused by an RNA virus with only one serotype. Humans are the only known host for this virus. This illness presents with the “3 C’s”: cough, Coryza (catarrhal inflammation in the nose) and conjunctivitis. This is accompanied by fever, malaise and the development of a rash. The rash is often the last symptom to appear. It starts on the head and travels downward. The most significant sign for measles is the presence of Koplik spots (whitish-grey spots) that appear on the buccal mucosa.
Measles can be transmitted by air and is considered a highly communicable disease. The virus resides in the nose and throat and is transmitted by coughing and sneezing. It can survive up to two hours on a surface and in the airspace where an infected person coughed or sneezed. About 90% of persons exposed will develop the disease.

The incubation period is 7–21 days after exposure. Rash may not be present until 14 days. A patient is considered contagious from four days before until four days after the rash appears.

Your best protection: If not already protected by having had the disease, get vaccinated.

EFAW Book update

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Slight change to your recent book if you attended a Emergency First Aid at Work(EFAW) course with me in the last 12 months

AED Data Collection

The Resuscitation Council (UK) no longer supplies or collects the AED event form that has been in use. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains an important priority for the Resuscitation Council (UK) and it has established a national out-of-hospital database with the British Heart Foundation and Association of Ambulance Medical Directors, in partnership with the University of Warwick. This audit also captures the events where a public access AED has been used before the arrival of the ambulance crew via a reusable and easily accessible new online event form. To that end, there is a requirement to reflect this information within the suite of Highfield First Aid books.

The required changes are below.

Page 9

The book states the following:

‘In cases where a defibrillator has been used, regardless of whether shocks were given or not, then the Event Report Form (ERF) requires completing in full and the white copy to be sent to the Resuscitation Council (UK) as soon as possible. The address of which can be found at the bottom of the form.’

This paragraph requires removing and the following inserted:

‘In cases where a public access AED has been used, dependent on local authority policies, there may be a requirement to report the event using a prescribed audit reporting chain’

 

Thank you

 

PK

Slight update to your FAW book.

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Slight change to your recent book if you attended a  First Aid at Work (FAW) course with me in the last 12 months

AED Data Collection

The Resuscitation Council (UK) no longer supplies or collects the AED event form that has been in use. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains an important priority for the Resuscitation Council (UK) and it has established a national out-of-hospital database with the British Heart Foundation and Association of Ambulance Medical Directors, in partnership with the University of Warwick. This audit also captures the events where a public access AED has been used before the arrival of the ambulance crew via a reusable and easily accessible new online event form. To that end, there is a requirement to reflect this information within the suite of Highfield First Aid books.

The required changes are below.

Page 7

The book states the following:

‘In cases where a defibrillator has been used, regardless of whether shocks were given or not, then the Event Report Form (ERF) requires completing in full and the white copy to be sent to the Resuscitation Council (UK) as soon as possible. The address of which can be found at the bottom of the form.’

This paragraph requires removing and the following inserted:

‘In cases where a public access AED has been used, dependent on local authority policies, there may be a requirement to report the event using a prescribed audit reporting chain’

 

Thank you

 

PK