Tag Archives: Asthma

Amendments to the Human Medicines Regulations 2012 to allow the supply of salbutamol inhalers to schools

For those of you having problems purchasing inhalers from independent pharmacists in the UK who may not be aware of the recent changes to the use of inhalers in schools.

I have attached a copy of the document you need to show them and please refer them to this section below which appears on page 12.

‘These Regulations amend the Human Medicines Regulations 2012, to allow schools to hold stocks of asthma inhalers containing salbutamol for use in an emergency. These regulations come into effect on 1st October 2014.
From this date onwards, schools can buy inhalers and spacers (the plastic funnels which make it easier to deliver asthma medicine to the lungs) from a pharmaceutical supplier in small quantities provided it is done on an occasional basis and is not for profit.
A supplier will need a request signed by the principal or head teacher (ideally on appropriately headed paper) stating:
• the name of the school for which the product is required; • the purpose for which that product is required, and • the total quantity required.
The Department of Health has also consulted on draft non-statutory guidance to support schools in England in their management of inhalers, and has revised this to take on board comments received from respondents. It is hoped that the current draft guidance (published simultaneously with this response) covers the major implementation issues raised in the consultation. DH will continue to refine the guidance in the light of any further comments received – particularly from schools as they implement the new arrangements.
As devolved administrations, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland will have respective responsibility for issuing guidance for their schools’.

Department_of_Health_response_to_asthma_consultation

Hope this helps

PK

12 Hour Paediatric First Aid update

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12 Hour Paediatric First Aid (UK)

It has recently been brought to our attention that some providers have received misleading information to say they are no longer required to complete the twelve hour paediatric first aid course and instead can access a six hour Emergency Paediatric First Aid Course.

It is a requirement of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) that at least one person who has a current paediatric first aid certificate must be on the premises at all times when children are present, and must accompany children on outings. First aid training must currently be local authority approved and be relevant for workers caring for young children. Childminders, and any assistant who might be in sole charge of the children for any period of time, must hold a current paediatric first aid certificate.

Ofsted have advised that providers should follow the guidelines outlined in Appendix 1 of the 2008 EYFS Practice Guidance in order to ensure good practice. This states:

Criteria for effective paediatric first aid training

In order to meet the requirements of the EYFS, paediatric first aid courses must be approved by the local authority in whose area the early years provision is located, and must meet the following criteria:

1 Training is designed for workers caring for children in the absence of their parents.

2 The training leading to a certificate or a renewal certificate is a minimum of 12 hours.

3 The first aid certificate should be renewed every three years.

4 Resuscitation and other equipment includes baby and junior models, as appropriate.

5 Training covers appropriate contents of a first aid box for babies and children.

6 Training should include recording accidents and incidents.

7 Training should be appropriate to the age of the children being cared for.

8 The course covers the following areas:

8.1 Planning for first aid emergencies.

8.2 Dealing with emergencies.

8.3 Resuscitation procedures appropriate to the age of children being cared for.

8.4 Recognising and dealing with shock.

8.5 Recognising and responding appropriately to anaphylactic shock.

8.6 Recognising and responding appropriately to electric shock.

8.7 Recognising and responding appropriately to bleeding.

8.8 Responding appropriately to burns and scalds.

8.9 Responding appropriately to choking.

8.10 Responding appropriately to suspected fractures.

8.11 Responding appropriately to head, neck and back injuries.

8.12 Recognising and responding appropriately to cases of poisoning.

8.13 Responding appropriately to foreign bodies in eyes, ears and noses.

8.14 Responding appropriately to eye injuries.

8.15 Responding appropriately to bites and stings.

8.16 Responding appropriately to the effects of extreme heat and cold.

8.17 Responding appropriately to febrile convulsions.

8.18 Recognising and responding appropriately to the emergency needs of children with chronic medical conditions, including epilepsy, asthma, sickle cell anaemia, diabetes.

8.19 Recognising and responding appropriately to meningitis and other serious sudden illnesses.

Practitioners have a duty for the safeguarding and welfare of the children in their care and it is vital that they are able to competently deal with any first aid requirements which may occur to ensure the safety of children. You should be reminded that it is the responsibility of the practitioners attending these courses to ensure they meet their needs both in terms of what the courses cover and the time taken to complete the course, and therefore we would recommend that you take note of the points covered in Appendix 1 above.

First Aid Box Contents Update 15

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1. There is no mandatory list of items to be included in a first-aid container. The decision on what to provide will be influenced by the findings of the first-aid needs assessment. As a guide, where work activities involve low hazards, a minimum stock of first-aid items might be:

  • a leaflet giving general guidance on first aid (for example, HSE’s leaflet Basic advice on first aid at work);
  • 20 individually wrapped sterile plasters (assorted sizes), appropriate to the type of work (hypoallergenic plasters can be provided if necessary);
  • two sterile eye pads;
  • two individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile;
  • six safety pins;
  • two large sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • six medium-sized sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • at least three pairs of disposable gloves (see HSE’s leaflet Latex and you6).

Attached is a Pdf list for the suggested workplace and travel kits.

First Aid Box Contents 15

Asthma Use in Schools

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guidance_on_use_of_emergency_inhalers_in_schools_October_2014

New guidelines from the 1st of October 2014 are now available to allow schools in England to keep inhalers and spacers as a emergency treatment if an identified pupil with an agreed careplan has an issue with their inhaler. They do not need a prescription to do this.

Schools can buy and keep emergency school inhalers on site as long as they follow the guidelines issued here in the attached pdf.

Sadly this only applies to primary and secondary Schools and maintained nurseries.

‘Including maintained schools, independent schools, independent educational institutions, pupil referral units and alternative provision academies. Maintained nursery schools are also eligible to hold an emergency salbutamol inhaler’. (‘Guidance on the use of emergency salbutamol inhalers in schools.  P8’).

As usual any questions you can email me.

Links to the government website are here.

PK

guidance_on_use_of_emergency_inhalers_in_schools_October_2014

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/360585/guidance_on_use_of_emergency_inhalers_in_schools_October_2014.pdf

For more information on our Asthma Awareness course email me at paulkenny@me.com