Tag Archives: Defib

Myth Buster: DEFIBRILLATION ON A WET OR METAL SURFACE

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“Can I shock someone if they are wet or on a metal surface”?

It is safe to defibrillate a patient on either a wet or metal surface as long as the appropriate safety precautions are taken. Specifically, care should be taken to ensure that no one is touching the patient when the shock button is pressed.

The attached document will answer your question.

DefibMyth15

EFAW Book update

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Slight change to your recent book if you attended a Emergency First Aid at Work(EFAW) course with me in the last 12 months

AED Data Collection

The Resuscitation Council (UK) no longer supplies or collects the AED event form that has been in use. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains an important priority for the Resuscitation Council (UK) and it has established a national out-of-hospital database with the British Heart Foundation and Association of Ambulance Medical Directors, in partnership with the University of Warwick. This audit also captures the events where a public access AED has been used before the arrival of the ambulance crew via a reusable and easily accessible new online event form. To that end, there is a requirement to reflect this information within the suite of Highfield First Aid books.

The required changes are below.

Page 9

The book states the following:

‘In cases where a defibrillator has been used, regardless of whether shocks were given or not, then the Event Report Form (ERF) requires completing in full and the white copy to be sent to the Resuscitation Council (UK) as soon as possible. The address of which can be found at the bottom of the form.’

This paragraph requires removing and the following inserted:

‘In cases where a public access AED has been used, dependent on local authority policies, there may be a requirement to report the event using a prescribed audit reporting chain’

 

Thank you

 

PK

Slight update to your FAW book.

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Slight change to your recent book if you attended a  First Aid at Work (FAW) course with me in the last 12 months

AED Data Collection

The Resuscitation Council (UK) no longer supplies or collects the AED event form that has been in use. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains an important priority for the Resuscitation Council (UK) and it has established a national out-of-hospital database with the British Heart Foundation and Association of Ambulance Medical Directors, in partnership with the University of Warwick. This audit also captures the events where a public access AED has been used before the arrival of the ambulance crew via a reusable and easily accessible new online event form. To that end, there is a requirement to reflect this information within the suite of Highfield First Aid books.

The required changes are below.

Page 7

The book states the following:

‘In cases where a defibrillator has been used, regardless of whether shocks were given or not, then the Event Report Form (ERF) requires completing in full and the white copy to be sent to the Resuscitation Council (UK) as soon as possible. The address of which can be found at the bottom of the form.’

This paragraph requires removing and the following inserted:

‘In cases where a public access AED has been used, dependent on local authority policies, there may be a requirement to report the event using a prescribed audit reporting chain’

 

Thank you

 

PK

AED use in schools.

AED Use in Schools

I get a number of requests for AED costs and the training required for AEDS.

There is a new guide that has been released by the UK Government for schools and a copy is available from the link below.

A question I get asked is about training provision and how long the training is valid for.

AED’s are simple to use and easy to maintain. There are a number of courses available. On average a course provided should last for three years and it is recommended that staff refresh skills every 6 months by either video or manikin practice. The guide the government has released covers this. It also has a link for skills to purchase a machine from the NHS. Below is a short extract from that document which I think is important.

‘AEDs, as work equipment, are covered by the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER), and as such this places duties on employers in respect of employee training and the provision of information and instructions in the use of such equipment. However, AEDs are designed to be used by someone without any specific training and by following step-by-step instructions on the AED at the time of use. It should therefore be sufficient for schools to circulate the manufacturer’s instructions to all staff and to provide a short general awareness briefing session in order to meet their statutory obligations. Schools may want to use this opportunity to raise awareness of the AED in school and to promote its use should the need arise.

The awareness briefing may also be incorporated into any wider training on CPR and the chain of survival’.

Any questions or if you want a quick skill update email me at paulkenny@me.com

Automated external defibrillators (AEDs): a guide for maintained schools and academies This is the .gov site.

Automated_external_defibrillators-Nov_2014 This is the PDF document.

Click the book to find out about our courses.

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