Tag Archives: Dog First Aid

Looking after Children during heat waves

 

Heatguide

New guide from Public Health For England. Advice for EYS for children in a Heat wave.

Looking_After_Children_Heat_PHE_AC_AB_Publications_MP_JRM_FINAL

Click the above link to download the pdf document or follow the link below to go to the website. There is also a document available for Adult care.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/heatwave-plan-for-england

 

 

 

What is Sickle Cell Anaemia?

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The disorder affects the red blood cells which contain a special protein called haemoglobin (Hb for short). The function of haemoglobin is to carry oxygen from the lungs to all parts of the body.

People with Sickle Cell Anaemia have Sickle haemoglobin (HbS) which is different from the normal haemoglobin (HbA). When sickle haemoglobin gives up its oxygen to the tissues, it sticks together to form long rods inside the red blood cells making these cells rigid and sickle-shaped. Normal red blood cells can bend and flex easily.

Blocked blood vessels

Because of their shape, sickled red blood cells can’t squeeze through small blood vessels as easily as the almost donut-shaped normal cells. This can lead to these small blood vessels getting blocked which then stops the oxygen from getting through to where it is needed. This in turn can lead to severe pain and damage to organs.

Who Gets SCDs?

The different kinds of SCD and the different traits are found mainly in people whose families come from Africa, the Caribbean, the Eastern Mediterranean, Middle East and Asia.* In Britain SCD is most common in people of African and Caribbean descent (at least 1 in 10-40 have sickle cell trait and 1 in 60-200 have SCD). It is estimated there are over 6,000 adults and children with SCD in Britain at present. There are other inherited conditions that mainly affect other groups, e.g. Cystic Fibrosis in Europeans, and Tay-Sachs disease in Jewish people.

Thalassaemia is a group of inherited blood disorders where the part of the blood known as haemoglobin is abnormal.

The abnormality means that the affected red blood cells are unable to function normally, which leads to anaemia (a red blood cell deficiency).

Red blood cells

Red blood cells are very important because they contain a substance called haemoglobin, which carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.

Haemoglobin is produced in the bone marrow (a spongy material found inside larger bones) using the iron that the body gets from food.

In thalassaemia, haemoglobin production is abnormal, leading to anaemia and a reduced oxygen-carrying capacity. If your body doesn’t receive enough oxygen, you’ll feel tired, breathless, drowsy and faint.

If left untreated, the most serious types of thalassaemia can cause other complications, including organ damage, restricted growth, liver disease, heart failure and death.

Who is affected by thalassaemia?

In England, beta thalassaemia major (BTM) is thought to affect around 1,000 people, with an estimated 214,000 carriers.

It most commonly affects people of Cypriot, Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Chinese origin.

In the UK, 8 out of 10 babies born with BTM have parents of Indian, Pakistani or Bangladeshi ancestry.

Sickle Cell and Thalassaemia: A guide to school policy [pdf]

A new law (Section 100 of the Children and Families Act 2014) places a duty on schools and academies to make arrangements for supporting pupils with medical conditions. Research has shown that schools struggle to support young people with sickle cell, but the Sickle Cell Society can offer help and advice. Working with university researchers our advisors have overseen the development of a Guide to School Policy for Sickle Cell.

Teachers are faced with many different possible medical conditions and it is not reasonable to expect them to remember details of all of them. At the same time young people with sickle cell dislike initiatives that draw attention to them as different from their peers,” said Professor Simon Dyson of De Montfort University, who led the team of researchers. “What was needed was a policy that supported the student with sickle cell but which operated in the background without overloading teachers with information”.

The Guide to School Policy for young people with sickle cell is based on examples of good practice and contains a template for drawing up an individual health care plan.

Dyson-School-policy-sickle-cell pdf.

Statutory_guidance_on_supporting_pupils_at_school_with_medical_conditions pdf.

For more information go to www.sicklecellsociety.org There is a great video on the website about Sickle cell and how a young person feels about the condition.

 

Incident reporting in schools and Nurseries (accidents, diseases and dangerous occurrences) Update

Accident 14   An ‘accident’ is defined as an unplanned and uncontrolled event that has (or could have) resulted in some sort of harm, The harm may be:

  • an injury (eg a cut or fracture)
  • an illness
  • a mental trauma

Major accidents are defined in the Reporting Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR).

I get a number of questions as to what should and should not be reported after an accident. Hopefully the attached HSE document should help. Make sure you read all the document to fully understand what should and should not be reported.

Always ensure that parents attention is brought to any accident involving a child.

Requirement to inform parents

The Early Years Foundation Stage requires providers, on the child’s admission, to seek parental permission for any necessary emergency medical advice or treatment in the future. Provider must also inform parents of any accidents or injuries sustained by the child while the child is in their care and of any first aid treatment given. It does not give a timescale in which to do this but it is good practice to do this on the same day. This will normally be when the child is collected from the childcare provider. Most providers do this by asking parents to view the record of the accident or injury and to sign to say they have seen it. If you wish to use this type of approach you must also be aware of the data protection rules and not allow parents to view personal information other than that relating to their own child. The requirement to inform parents is more general than that to notify Ofsted and parents should be informed of any accident or injury especially where first aid is necessary. Where a child is picked up by someone other than the child’s parent, with the permission of the parent, we would normally accept that notifying this person is sufficient to satisfy this requirement. You may wish to establish this practice by including it in the information you give to parents. The Childcare Register does not specifically require you to inform parents, but it remains good practice to do so.

‘Serious accidents, injuries and deaths that registered providers must notify to Ofsted and local child protection agencies’ (A childcare fact sheet October 2011).

If accidents do occur they should be investigated to prevent them from happening again. The main points to consider when investigating accidents that have caused injuries or damage are:

  • ensure that accidents, especially serious ones, are reported immediately;
  • ensure any injured people are safe and given appropriate medical or first-aid treatment;
  • seal off the scene of the accident – this stops other people getting hurt and will save any evidence;
  • record the contact details of any witnesses;
  • take photographs or draw a sketch of the accident scene;
  • take witness statements – this should be in writing and done as soon aas possible;
  • find out what caused the accident and why it happened. Don’t just look at what caused the injury or damage, find the ‘root’ cause, ie the first event that occurred in the series of events that led to the injury or damage;
  • decide what you need to do to prevent the same accident happening again, and do it;
  • review the actions you have taken to ensure they are effective
  • make sure the accident form or book is filled in.

Remember an accident report is a legal document and as such should not be shared or given out without having an audit trail for any requests and ideally these should be made in writing. In some instances It might be advisable to check with your insurance company and or your governing body to ensure that they are happy for the information to be given out and shared. Remember you can’t refuse to show or share the information with parents but it is a legal document so therefore it is advisable to ensure you have an audit trail for such information requests.

Handouts.

Serious accidents, injuries and deaths that registered providers must notify to Ofsted and local child protection agencies Schoolaccidents

Toolbox Talk

Studenten halten Daumen hoch in der UniToolbox talks are a way of ensuring best practice in your workplace.

Since my post yesterday I have had a number of emails asking what a ‘Toolbox Talk’ is?

Toolbox talks are a way of disseminating information on a topic to a group of people you work with to make sure that everyone gets the same message, that they understand that message and in some instances you get them to sign to say they have read and understand that information. It is a way of ensuring that all staff follow best practice. The talk should be brief and presented during work time.

The recent document on Mongolian blue is a good example. Print the document attach a cover sheet with a toolbox number, attach a sheet with all the staff names and ask them to sign it when they have read it. Nominate a member of staff to coordinate the document and ensure that staff know they can go to that person to ask questions if they need to. The document and the information will take no more than 5 minutes to present in the staff room. Limit the document to two weeks on the notice board and then chase up any staff who have not read it and then when complete file it in a folder that must be accessible at all times.

If you number the documents sequentially you can track who has and who has not read the information.

 

 

Pet First Aid Kit

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I am happy to announce that our new first aid range is now available to buy from our sales website http://www.paulkenny.so.

To launch the new site we are offering the Pet First Aid Kit at the special price of £7.99 for a limited time.

Watch out for our pet first aid courses we are running later this year.

More items are being added daily.

First Aid Box Contents

 

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You have a choice when it comes to first aid kits. There are a number of them out there for sale. But which one is the right one for you?

Your first aid needs assessment will determine what size you need and this will then dictate what the contents are.

You can go over the top and purchase a kit that meets to the new BSI standards. Or you can go for the minimum.

The minimum anyone should work to is the following advised by the http://www.HSE.gov.uk website:

What should a first-aid box in the workplace contain?

There is no mandatory list of contents for first-aid boxes and HSE does not ‘approve’ or endorse particular products. Deciding what to include should be based on an employer’s assessment of first-aid needs. As a guide, where work activities involve low hazards, a minimum stock of first-aid items might be:

  • 20 individually wrapped sterile plasters (assorted sizes), appropriate to the type of work (you can provide hypoallergenic plasters, if necessary);
  • two sterile eye pads;
  • four individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile;
  • six safety pins;
  • two large, individually wrapped, sterile, unmedicated wound dressings;
  • six medium-sized, individually wrapped, sterile, unmedicated wound dressings;
  • a pair of disposable gloves, see HSE’s free leaflet: Latex and you PDF.

This is only a suggested contents list.

It is recommended that you don’t keep tablets and medicines in the first-aid box.

More advice is given in HSE’s free leaflet: First aid at work: your questions answered.

Remember that where children are there should always be a first aid kit available and staff trained to use it. If out in a car or out for a walk if you look after children you should have a first aid kit (and water if possible) with you.

Check out the HSE website http://www.hse.gov.uk and search for first aid box.

Also a new web store will be available soon selling the contents at reduced prices. watch this space for it.

PK