Tag Archives: First Aid Needs Assessment

12 Hour Paediatric First Aid update

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12 Hour Paediatric First Aid (UK)

It has recently been brought to our attention that some providers have received misleading information to say they are no longer required to complete the twelve hour paediatric first aid course and instead can access a six hour Emergency Paediatric First Aid Course.

It is a requirement of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) that at least one person who has a current paediatric first aid certificate must be on the premises at all times when children are present, and must accompany children on outings. First aid training must currently be local authority approved and be relevant for workers caring for young children. Childminders, and any assistant who might be in sole charge of the children for any period of time, must hold a current paediatric first aid certificate.

Ofsted have advised that providers should follow the guidelines outlined in Appendix 1 of the 2008 EYFS Practice Guidance in order to ensure good practice. This states:

Criteria for effective paediatric first aid training

In order to meet the requirements of the EYFS, paediatric first aid courses must be approved by the local authority in whose area the early years provision is located, and must meet the following criteria:

1 Training is designed for workers caring for children in the absence of their parents.

2 The training leading to a certificate or a renewal certificate is a minimum of 12 hours.

3 The first aid certificate should be renewed every three years.

4 Resuscitation and other equipment includes baby and junior models, as appropriate.

5 Training covers appropriate contents of a first aid box for babies and children.

6 Training should include recording accidents and incidents.

7 Training should be appropriate to the age of the children being cared for.

8 The course covers the following areas:

8.1 Planning for first aid emergencies.

8.2 Dealing with emergencies.

8.3 Resuscitation procedures appropriate to the age of children being cared for.

8.4 Recognising and dealing with shock.

8.5 Recognising and responding appropriately to anaphylactic shock.

8.6 Recognising and responding appropriately to electric shock.

8.7 Recognising and responding appropriately to bleeding.

8.8 Responding appropriately to burns and scalds.

8.9 Responding appropriately to choking.

8.10 Responding appropriately to suspected fractures.

8.11 Responding appropriately to head, neck and back injuries.

8.12 Recognising and responding appropriately to cases of poisoning.

8.13 Responding appropriately to foreign bodies in eyes, ears and noses.

8.14 Responding appropriately to eye injuries.

8.15 Responding appropriately to bites and stings.

8.16 Responding appropriately to the effects of extreme heat and cold.

8.17 Responding appropriately to febrile convulsions.

8.18 Recognising and responding appropriately to the emergency needs of children with chronic medical conditions, including epilepsy, asthma, sickle cell anaemia, diabetes.

8.19 Recognising and responding appropriately to meningitis and other serious sudden illnesses.

Practitioners have a duty for the safeguarding and welfare of the children in their care and it is vital that they are able to competently deal with any first aid requirements which may occur to ensure the safety of children. You should be reminded that it is the responsibility of the practitioners attending these courses to ensure they meet their needs both in terms of what the courses cover and the time taken to complete the course, and therefore we would recommend that you take note of the points covered in Appendix 1 above.

First Aid Box Contents Update 15

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1. There is no mandatory list of items to be included in a first-aid container. The decision on what to provide will be influenced by the findings of the first-aid needs assessment. As a guide, where work activities involve low hazards, a minimum stock of first-aid items might be:

  • a leaflet giving general guidance on first aid (for example, HSE’s leaflet Basic advice on first aid at work);
  • 20 individually wrapped sterile plasters (assorted sizes), appropriate to the type of work (hypoallergenic plasters can be provided if necessary);
  • two sterile eye pads;
  • two individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile;
  • six safety pins;
  • two large sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • six medium-sized sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • at least three pairs of disposable gloves (see HSE’s leaflet Latex and you6).

Attached is a Pdf list for the suggested workplace and travel kits.

First Aid Box Contents 15

Checking First Aid Kits (UK)

Green first kit equipmentWhen ever children and adults are on site and whenever they leave the building on official duties or trips they must have access to a first aid kit. This also relates to solo workers.

There are no set guidelines for checking kits, however it is advisable to check them on a regular basis to ensure they are fully stocked.

Planning frequency depends on use. A review of your accidents over the last twelve months for your first aid needs assessment will tell you how often each box or bag is used and it should highlight the type of accidents you are dealing with. Each box/bag is stocked with items that reflect this audit.

There is a recommended minimum for your kits which is shown on my website www.paulkenny.me This list is also available from the HSE website.

There are two lists:

When checking kits, the contents should be:

  • Within the use by date
  • Still sealed
  • Packaging intact
  • Stocked to match the number of bodies on site
  • Is water available close to the kit?

You can have what ever you want as long as you justify it with evidence from previous incidents.

Remember no pills, creams or potions.

Water needs to be available at all times so wall kits need to be mounted near or in the same room as a sink and portable kits need a small sealed, sterile water bottle. ‘Still’ water bottles with a sports nozzle are ideal but remember it needs to be sterile and sealed. Also if it is a bottle of water it needs a sticker on saying for First Aid or HSE use only.

As a company we check our first aid kits every Monday and record in each kit a completion list on a monthly checklist. Each week a different member of the team checks the kits as each one has additional items as well as the HSE Minimum to meet that area of use. By doing the rotation on staff checks, all staff get familiar with the kits in that room or area.

Each kit has copies of blank accident forms and Patient report forms as well as the monthly check tick sheet. We also have a monthly treatment spreadsheet for minor injuries where wipes or plasters are used and don’t need a full accident form. On playground duties this spreadsheet will be daily and must be stored in a folder in the office. The only people to access this should be recognized first aiders.

As a busy first aid company we check fixed wall kits weekly and our portable kits daily.

If you have mobile kits used everyday on playground duties then these should be checked daily and a small amount of regular used stock need to held on site. Don’t hoard dressings as they usually only have a short 3 to 4 year shelf life.

If you are a venue that does not have many incidents the minimum really should be monthly.

I have not mentioned the BS8599-1 kits here and will cover this in my next update.

Hope this helps.

Email me on paulkenny@me.com for any information you need.

PK