Tag Archives: Ice

First Aid Box Contents Update 15

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1. There is no mandatory list of items to be included in a first-aid container. The decision on what to provide will be influenced by the findings of the first-aid needs assessment. As a guide, where work activities involve low hazards, a minimum stock of first-aid items might be:

  • a leaflet giving general guidance on first aid (for example, HSE’s leaflet Basic advice on first aid at work);
  • 20 individually wrapped sterile plasters (assorted sizes), appropriate to the type of work (hypoallergenic plasters can be provided if necessary);
  • two sterile eye pads;
  • two individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile;
  • six safety pins;
  • two large sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • six medium-sized sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • at least three pairs of disposable gloves (see HSE’s leaflet Latex and you6).

Attached is a Pdf list for the suggested workplace and travel kits.

First Aid Box Contents 15

Toolbox Talk

Studenten halten Daumen hoch in der UniToolbox talks are a way of ensuring best practice in your workplace.

Since my post yesterday I have had a number of emails asking what a ‘Toolbox Talk’ is?

Toolbox talks are a way of disseminating information on a topic to a group of people you work with to make sure that everyone gets the same message, that they understand that message and in some instances you get them to sign to say they have read and understand that information. It is a way of ensuring that all staff follow best practice. The talk should be brief and presented during work time.

The recent document on Mongolian blue is a good example. Print the document attach a cover sheet with a toolbox number, attach a sheet with all the staff names and ask them to sign it when they have read it. Nominate a member of staff to coordinate the document and ensure that staff know they can go to that person to ask questions if they need to. The document and the information will take no more than 5 minutes to present in the staff room. Limit the document to two weeks on the notice board and then chase up any staff who have not read it and then when complete file it in a folder that must be accessible at all times.

If you number the documents sequentially you can track who has and who has not read the information.

 

 

RIDDOR is changing

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A brief guide to the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR)

Overview

RIDDOR is changing

From 1 October 2013 the revised Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR 2013) come into force.

RIDDOR is the law that requires employers, and other people in charge of work premises, to report and keep records of:

  • work-related accidents which cause deaths
  • work-related accidents which cause certain serious injuries (reportable injuries)
  • diagnosed cases of certain industrial diseases; and
  • certain ‘dangerous occurrences’ (incidents with the potential to cause harm)

This leaflet identifies what is required from employers and provides updated information about RIDDOR.

What is changing in RIDDOR from October 2013?

The main changes are to simplify the reporting requirements in the following areas:

  • the classification of ‘major injuries’ to workers is being replaced with a shorter list of ‘specified injuries’
  • the existing schedule detailing 47 types of industrial disease is being replaced with eight categories of reportable work-related illness
  • fewer types of ‘dangerous occurrence’ require reporting

There are no significant changes to the reporting requirements for:

  • fatal accidents
  • accidents to non-workers (members of the public)
  • accidents which result in the incapacitation of a worker for more than seven days

Recording requirements will remain broadly unchanged, including the requirement to record accidents resulting in the incapacitation of a worker for more than three days.

Injuries to non-workers

Work-related accidents involving members of the public or people who are not at work must be reported if a person is injured, and is taken from the scene of the accident to hospital for treatment to that injury. There is no requirement to establish what hospital treatment was actually provided, and no need to report incidents where people are taken to hospital purely as a precaution when no injury is apparent.

Types of reportable injury

Deaths

All deaths to workers and non-workers must be reported if they arise from a work- related accident, including an act of physical violence to a worker. Suicides are not reportable, as the death does not result from a work-related accident.

  1. Specified injuries to workers
    • The list of ‘specified injuries’ in RIDDOR 2013 (regulation 4) includes:
    • a fracture, other than to fingers, thumbs and toes;
    • amputation of an arm, hand, finger, thumb, leg, foot or toe;
    • permanent loss of sight or reduction of sight;
    • crush injuries leading to internal organ damage;
    • serious burns (covering more than 10% of the body, or damaging the eyes,respiratory system or other vital organs);
    • scalpings (separation of skin from the head) which require hospital treatment;
    • unconsciousness caused by head injury or asphyxia;
    • any other injury arising from working in an enclosed space, which leads tohypothermia, heat-induced illness or requires resuscitation or admittance to hospital for more than 24 hours.

The document is available here free:

RIDDOR13

Travel First Aid Kit contents update 2013

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I have below attached a copy of the latest guideline from the HSE in relation to travel first aid kits.

Remember to include this in your first aid needs assessment you have to complete for your workplace.

Travelling first-aid kit contents

There is no mandatory list of items to be included in first-aid kits for travelling workers. They might typically contain:

  • a leaflet giving general guidance on first aid (for example HSE’s leaflet Basic advice on first aid at work5);
  • six individually wrapped sterile plasters (hypoallergenic plasters can be provided, if necessary);
  • two individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile;
  • two safety pins;
  • one large sterile un-medicated dressing;
  • individually wrapped moist cleansing wipes;
  • two pairs of disposable gloves (see HSE’s leaflet Latex and you6).

The above should be considered as suggested contents lists only.

The above guidelines are found on page 32 of the document:

The Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981. Guidance on Regulations

Updated 2013 available free from http://www.hse.gov.uk

We have a bumbag available for £7.00 which contains all of the above. Check out our sales website at :   http://www.paulkenny.so

Myth Buster 4 – Head Injuries and Cold Packs

ambulance shirtv4.011I have recently had a number of people who have been on other courses and have been told not to use cold packs on head injuries.

This Myth has been around for quite awhile and has caused some schools to wrongly stop using cold packs for bumps on the head.

I think the myth comes from the mistake not to put pressure on the skull in case there is an underlying fracture. But you can apply a cold pack without applying pressure. Also did I mention that the skull and facial bones are very hard and are designed to protect the brain which is soft. Remember ice should never be put directly onto the skin but use a cloth. Also Ice or cold packs should be applied roughly thirty minutes on and thirty minutes off and then repeated.

I will be adding head injuries on here soon so keep checking back.

 

 

New Forehead Thermometer for kids temps

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Great new product available from larger Tesco stores for just less than £20.00. Great way to get the temperature of a child with out touching them. Just scan the forehead and the machine reads the temperature and stores it. When you have finished it will then enter into standby mode and will read the room temperature. Simple to use but great when a child is sleeping due to illness. The more information you can give the GP, Emergency Department staff or ambulance service the better the treatment.

We have been using this now for two weeks and have found it works brilliantly, Child safe battery compartment but watch the clear plastic head cover it is the right size for children’s mouths so could be a choking problem if left unsupervised.

This is a really great product and is working well for us at the moment.

 

PK

 

First Aid Box Contents

 

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You have a choice when it comes to first aid kits. There are a number of them out there for sale. But which one is the right one for you?

Your first aid needs assessment will determine what size you need and this will then dictate what the contents are.

You can go over the top and purchase a kit that meets to the new BSI standards. Or you can go for the minimum.

The minimum anyone should work to is the following advised by the http://www.HSE.gov.uk website:

What should a first-aid box in the workplace contain?

There is no mandatory list of contents for first-aid boxes and HSE does not ‘approve’ or endorse particular products. Deciding what to include should be based on an employer’s assessment of first-aid needs. As a guide, where work activities involve low hazards, a minimum stock of first-aid items might be:

  • 20 individually wrapped sterile plasters (assorted sizes), appropriate to the type of work (you can provide hypoallergenic plasters, if necessary);
  • two sterile eye pads;
  • four individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile;
  • six safety pins;
  • two large, individually wrapped, sterile, unmedicated wound dressings;
  • six medium-sized, individually wrapped, sterile, unmedicated wound dressings;
  • a pair of disposable gloves, see HSE’s free leaflet: Latex and you PDF.

This is only a suggested contents list.

It is recommended that you don’t keep tablets and medicines in the first-aid box.

More advice is given in HSE’s free leaflet: First aid at work: your questions answered.

Remember that where children are there should always be a first aid kit available and staff trained to use it. If out in a car or out for a walk if you look after children you should have a first aid kit (and water if possible) with you.

Check out the HSE website http://www.hse.gov.uk and search for first aid box.

Also a new web store will be available soon selling the contents at reduced prices. watch this space for it.

PK