Tag Archives: ill child

New ‘gold standard’ in paediatric first aid launched

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A new initiative to help improve paediatric first aid training in early years settings has been launched today by Education and Childcare Minister Sam Gyimah, in memory of a 9-month-old girl who tragically died in 2012.

Millie Thompson passed away after choking on her lunch while at nursery in Stockport. Since her death, Millie’s parents Joanne and Dan have campaigned for a new ‘gold standard’ certificate to be created in recognition of early years childcare providers that train all their staff in paediatric first aid, going above and beyond the minimum legal requirements.

The quality mark – which has been developed by the Department for Education (DfE), National Day Nursery Association (NDNA) and the Thompsons – will be known as ‘Millie’s Mark’ and will help to give parents assurance that every staff member that cares for their child is trained in these important, life-saving skills.

From summer 2016, early years settings in England will be eligible to apply to be accredited with this unique quality mark that will provide parents with the assurance that their child is being cared for by safe and knowledgeable staff. The quality mark will be in addition to the existing statutory requirements for paediatric first aid that all early years providers must meet as a legal requirement.

Alongside the launch of Millie’s Mark, the government has today published a response to the consultation on changing the paediatric first aid requirements in the statutory framework for the early years foundation stage (EYFS). The majority of those who responded were in favour of increasing the number of paediatric first aiders in early years settings.

So, from this September [2016], all newly qualified level 2 and level 3 staff must also have either a full paediatric first aid certificate or an emergency paediatric first aid certificate to count in the required staff to child ratios.

‘So for Nurseries that have trained with us at BUFFS and have the New Level 3 Paediatric first aid certificate you need to read the information below and if you meet all the criteria you can apply’. PK

Millie’s Mark – Paediatric First Aid

NDNA has been awarded a contract to deliver Millie’s Mark, the new quality mark

for nurseries where all employees are trained in paediatric first aid.

Nurseries will be able to apply for Millie’s Mark, which will be awarded as a special endorsement to childcare providers that can meet a set criteria including:

  • Evidence of needs assessment for setting staff
  • Evidence that all staff hold an appropriate in-date PFA (full or emergency) certificate
  • Evidence of classroom-based training for one-day courses.

The awarding of Millie’s Mark will be dependent on all of the criteria being met in addition to the legal requirements as set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) Statutory Framework.

These childcare providers will work to keep these crucial skills in the forefront of their employees’ minds, so that they are competent and ready to act in an emergency situation. 

The aims of Millie’s Mark are to keep children safe and minimise risk and accidents by:

  • Raising standards in paediatric first aid
  • Increasing numbers of first aid-trained staff
  • Increasing competency in applying first aid
  • Enabling staff to respond quickly in emergencies
  • Raising the quality and skills of the early years workforce and helping them with day-to-day first aid issues, such as allergies
  • And providing reassurance to parents.

Red Poinsettias. Safe for Kids?

Red Poinsettias in Pots on Display in a Plant Nursery

Poinsettia plants are less toxic than once believed.

In most cases, poinsettia exposure causes only discomfort, including:

  • A mild, itchy rash. Skin contact with the sap of a poinsettia plant can cause a rash, If this happens, wash the affected area with soap and water. Apply a cool compress to ease itching.
  • A mild stomachache, vomiting or diarrhea. This can happen after eating part of a poinsettia plant. Severe signs and symptoms are unlikely, If you find a child eating a poinsettia plant, clear and rinse his or her mouth.
  • Eye irritation. If the sap of a poinsettia plant comes in contact with the eyes, they can become red and irritated. If this happens, flush the eyes with water.
  • Allergic reaction. Some people are more sensitive to poinsettia plants than are others. Reactions to poinsettia plants are more common among people who have latex allergies, since latex and poinsettia plants share several proteins. In case of a severe reaction, seek prompt medical attention.
Taken from Answers from Jay L. Hoecker, M.D. at the Mayo Clinic

First Aid Box Contents Update 15

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1. There is no mandatory list of items to be included in a first-aid container. The decision on what to provide will be influenced by the findings of the first-aid needs assessment. As a guide, where work activities involve low hazards, a minimum stock of first-aid items might be:

  • a leaflet giving general guidance on first aid (for example, HSE’s leaflet Basic advice on first aid at work);
  • 20 individually wrapped sterile plasters (assorted sizes), appropriate to the type of work (hypoallergenic plasters can be provided if necessary);
  • two sterile eye pads;
  • two individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile;
  • six safety pins;
  • two large sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • six medium-sized sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • at least three pairs of disposable gloves (see HSE’s leaflet Latex and you6).

Attached is a Pdf list for the suggested workplace and travel kits.

First Aid Box Contents 15

EFAW Book update

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Slight change to your recent book if you attended a Emergency First Aid at Work(EFAW) course with me in the last 12 months

AED Data Collection

The Resuscitation Council (UK) no longer supplies or collects the AED event form that has been in use. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains an important priority for the Resuscitation Council (UK) and it has established a national out-of-hospital database with the British Heart Foundation and Association of Ambulance Medical Directors, in partnership with the University of Warwick. This audit also captures the events where a public access AED has been used before the arrival of the ambulance crew via a reusable and easily accessible new online event form. To that end, there is a requirement to reflect this information within the suite of Highfield First Aid books.

The required changes are below.

Page 9

The book states the following:

‘In cases where a defibrillator has been used, regardless of whether shocks were given or not, then the Event Report Form (ERF) requires completing in full and the white copy to be sent to the Resuscitation Council (UK) as soon as possible. The address of which can be found at the bottom of the form.’

This paragraph requires removing and the following inserted:

‘In cases where a public access AED has been used, dependent on local authority policies, there may be a requirement to report the event using a prescribed audit reporting chain’

 

Thank you

 

PK

What is Sickle Cell Anaemia?

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The disorder affects the red blood cells which contain a special protein called haemoglobin (Hb for short). The function of haemoglobin is to carry oxygen from the lungs to all parts of the body.

People with Sickle Cell Anaemia have Sickle haemoglobin (HbS) which is different from the normal haemoglobin (HbA). When sickle haemoglobin gives up its oxygen to the tissues, it sticks together to form long rods inside the red blood cells making these cells rigid and sickle-shaped. Normal red blood cells can bend and flex easily.

Blocked blood vessels

Because of their shape, sickled red blood cells can’t squeeze through small blood vessels as easily as the almost donut-shaped normal cells. This can lead to these small blood vessels getting blocked which then stops the oxygen from getting through to where it is needed. This in turn can lead to severe pain and damage to organs.

Who Gets SCDs?

The different kinds of SCD and the different traits are found mainly in people whose families come from Africa, the Caribbean, the Eastern Mediterranean, Middle East and Asia.* In Britain SCD is most common in people of African and Caribbean descent (at least 1 in 10-40 have sickle cell trait and 1 in 60-200 have SCD). It is estimated there are over 6,000 adults and children with SCD in Britain at present. There are other inherited conditions that mainly affect other groups, e.g. Cystic Fibrosis in Europeans, and Tay-Sachs disease in Jewish people.

Thalassaemia is a group of inherited blood disorders where the part of the blood known as haemoglobin is abnormal.

The abnormality means that the affected red blood cells are unable to function normally, which leads to anaemia (a red blood cell deficiency).

Red blood cells

Red blood cells are very important because they contain a substance called haemoglobin, which carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.

Haemoglobin is produced in the bone marrow (a spongy material found inside larger bones) using the iron that the body gets from food.

In thalassaemia, haemoglobin production is abnormal, leading to anaemia and a reduced oxygen-carrying capacity. If your body doesn’t receive enough oxygen, you’ll feel tired, breathless, drowsy and faint.

If left untreated, the most serious types of thalassaemia can cause other complications, including organ damage, restricted growth, liver disease, heart failure and death.

Who is affected by thalassaemia?

In England, beta thalassaemia major (BTM) is thought to affect around 1,000 people, with an estimated 214,000 carriers.

It most commonly affects people of Cypriot, Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Chinese origin.

In the UK, 8 out of 10 babies born with BTM have parents of Indian, Pakistani or Bangladeshi ancestry.

Sickle Cell and Thalassaemia: A guide to school policy [pdf]

A new law (Section 100 of the Children and Families Act 2014) places a duty on schools and academies to make arrangements for supporting pupils with medical conditions. Research has shown that schools struggle to support young people with sickle cell, but the Sickle Cell Society can offer help and advice. Working with university researchers our advisors have overseen the development of a Guide to School Policy for Sickle Cell.

Teachers are faced with many different possible medical conditions and it is not reasonable to expect them to remember details of all of them. At the same time young people with sickle cell dislike initiatives that draw attention to them as different from their peers,” said Professor Simon Dyson of De Montfort University, who led the team of researchers. “What was needed was a policy that supported the student with sickle cell but which operated in the background without overloading teachers with information”.

The Guide to School Policy for young people with sickle cell is based on examples of good practice and contains a template for drawing up an individual health care plan.

Dyson-School-policy-sickle-cell pdf.

Statutory_guidance_on_supporting_pupils_at_school_with_medical_conditions pdf.

For more information go to www.sicklecellsociety.org There is a great video on the website about Sickle cell and how a young person feels about the condition.

 

Checking First Aid Kits (UK)

Green first kit equipmentWhen ever children and adults are on site and whenever they leave the building on official duties or trips they must have access to a first aid kit. This also relates to solo workers.

There are no set guidelines for checking kits, however it is advisable to check them on a regular basis to ensure they are fully stocked.

Planning frequency depends on use. A review of your accidents over the last twelve months for your first aid needs assessment will tell you how often each box or bag is used and it should highlight the type of accidents you are dealing with. Each box/bag is stocked with items that reflect this audit.

There is a recommended minimum for your kits which is shown on my website www.paulkenny.me This list is also available from the HSE website.

There are two lists:

When checking kits, the contents should be:

  • Within the use by date
  • Still sealed
  • Packaging intact
  • Stocked to match the number of bodies on site
  • Is water available close to the kit?

You can have what ever you want as long as you justify it with evidence from previous incidents.

Remember no pills, creams or potions.

Water needs to be available at all times so wall kits need to be mounted near or in the same room as a sink and portable kits need a small sealed, sterile water bottle. ‘Still’ water bottles with a sports nozzle are ideal but remember it needs to be sterile and sealed. Also if it is a bottle of water it needs a sticker on saying for First Aid or HSE use only.

As a company we check our first aid kits every Monday and record in each kit a completion list on a monthly checklist. Each week a different member of the team checks the kits as each one has additional items as well as the HSE Minimum to meet that area of use. By doing the rotation on staff checks, all staff get familiar with the kits in that room or area.

Each kit has copies of blank accident forms and Patient report forms as well as the monthly check tick sheet. We also have a monthly treatment spreadsheet for minor injuries where wipes or plasters are used and don’t need a full accident form. On playground duties this spreadsheet will be daily and must be stored in a folder in the office. The only people to access this should be recognized first aiders.

As a busy first aid company we check fixed wall kits weekly and our portable kits daily.

If you have mobile kits used everyday on playground duties then these should be checked daily and a small amount of regular used stock need to held on site. Don’t hoard dressings as they usually only have a short 3 to 4 year shelf life.

If you are a venue that does not have many incidents the minimum really should be monthly.

I have not mentioned the BS8599-1 kits here and will cover this in my next update.

Hope this helps.

Email me on paulkenny@me.com for any information you need.

PK

AED use in schools.

AED Use in Schools

I get a number of requests for AED costs and the training required for AEDS.

There is a new guide that has been released by the UK Government for schools and a copy is available from the link below.

A question I get asked is about training provision and how long the training is valid for.

AED’s are simple to use and easy to maintain. There are a number of courses available. On average a course provided should last for three years and it is recommended that staff refresh skills every 6 months by either video or manikin practice. The guide the government has released covers this. It also has a link for skills to purchase a machine from the NHS. Below is a short extract from that document which I think is important.

‘AEDs, as work equipment, are covered by the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER), and as such this places duties on employers in respect of employee training and the provision of information and instructions in the use of such equipment. However, AEDs are designed to be used by someone without any specific training and by following step-by-step instructions on the AED at the time of use. It should therefore be sufficient for schools to circulate the manufacturer’s instructions to all staff and to provide a short general awareness briefing session in order to meet their statutory obligations. Schools may want to use this opportunity to raise awareness of the AED in school and to promote its use should the need arise.

The awareness briefing may also be incorporated into any wider training on CPR and the chain of survival’.

Any questions or if you want a quick skill update email me at paulkenny@me.com

Automated external defibrillators (AEDs): a guide for maintained schools and academies This is the .gov site.

Automated_external_defibrillators-Nov_2014 This is the PDF document.

Click the book to find out about our courses.

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