Tag Archives: Stroke

Looking after Children during heat waves

 

Heatguide

New guide from Public Health For England. Advice for EYS for children in a Heat wave.

Looking_After_Children_Heat_PHE_AC_AB_Publications_MP_JRM_FINAL

Click the above link to download the pdf document or follow the link below to go to the website. There is also a document available for Adult care.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/heatwave-plan-for-england

 

 

 

What is Sickle Cell Anaemia?

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The disorder affects the red blood cells which contain a special protein called haemoglobin (Hb for short). The function of haemoglobin is to carry oxygen from the lungs to all parts of the body.

People with Sickle Cell Anaemia have Sickle haemoglobin (HbS) which is different from the normal haemoglobin (HbA). When sickle haemoglobin gives up its oxygen to the tissues, it sticks together to form long rods inside the red blood cells making these cells rigid and sickle-shaped. Normal red blood cells can bend and flex easily.

Blocked blood vessels

Because of their shape, sickled red blood cells can’t squeeze through small blood vessels as easily as the almost donut-shaped normal cells. This can lead to these small blood vessels getting blocked which then stops the oxygen from getting through to where it is needed. This in turn can lead to severe pain and damage to organs.

Who Gets SCDs?

The different kinds of SCD and the different traits are found mainly in people whose families come from Africa, the Caribbean, the Eastern Mediterranean, Middle East and Asia.* In Britain SCD is most common in people of African and Caribbean descent (at least 1 in 10-40 have sickle cell trait and 1 in 60-200 have SCD). It is estimated there are over 6,000 adults and children with SCD in Britain at present. There are other inherited conditions that mainly affect other groups, e.g. Cystic Fibrosis in Europeans, and Tay-Sachs disease in Jewish people.

Thalassaemia is a group of inherited blood disorders where the part of the blood known as haemoglobin is abnormal.

The abnormality means that the affected red blood cells are unable to function normally, which leads to anaemia (a red blood cell deficiency).

Red blood cells

Red blood cells are very important because they contain a substance called haemoglobin, which carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.

Haemoglobin is produced in the bone marrow (a spongy material found inside larger bones) using the iron that the body gets from food.

In thalassaemia, haemoglobin production is abnormal, leading to anaemia and a reduced oxygen-carrying capacity. If your body doesn’t receive enough oxygen, you’ll feel tired, breathless, drowsy and faint.

If left untreated, the most serious types of thalassaemia can cause other complications, including organ damage, restricted growth, liver disease, heart failure and death.

Who is affected by thalassaemia?

In England, beta thalassaemia major (BTM) is thought to affect around 1,000 people, with an estimated 214,000 carriers.

It most commonly affects people of Cypriot, Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Chinese origin.

In the UK, 8 out of 10 babies born with BTM have parents of Indian, Pakistani or Bangladeshi ancestry.

Sickle Cell and Thalassaemia: A guide to school policy [pdf]

A new law (Section 100 of the Children and Families Act 2014) places a duty on schools and academies to make arrangements for supporting pupils with medical conditions. Research has shown that schools struggle to support young people with sickle cell, but the Sickle Cell Society can offer help and advice. Working with university researchers our advisors have overseen the development of a Guide to School Policy for Sickle Cell.

Teachers are faced with many different possible medical conditions and it is not reasonable to expect them to remember details of all of them. At the same time young people with sickle cell dislike initiatives that draw attention to them as different from their peers,” said Professor Simon Dyson of De Montfort University, who led the team of researchers. “What was needed was a policy that supported the student with sickle cell but which operated in the background without overloading teachers with information”.

The Guide to School Policy for young people with sickle cell is based on examples of good practice and contains a template for drawing up an individual health care plan.

Dyson-School-policy-sickle-cell pdf.

Statutory_guidance_on_supporting_pupils_at_school_with_medical_conditions pdf.

For more information go to www.sicklecellsociety.org There is a great video on the website about Sickle cell and how a young person feels about the condition.

 

Checking First Aid Kits (UK)

Green first kit equipmentWhen ever children and adults are on site and whenever they leave the building on official duties or trips they must have access to a first aid kit. This also relates to solo workers.

There are no set guidelines for checking kits, however it is advisable to check them on a regular basis to ensure they are fully stocked.

Planning frequency depends on use. A review of your accidents over the last twelve months for your first aid needs assessment will tell you how often each box or bag is used and it should highlight the type of accidents you are dealing with. Each box/bag is stocked with items that reflect this audit.

There is a recommended minimum for your kits which is shown on my website www.paulkenny.me This list is also available from the HSE website.

There are two lists:

When checking kits, the contents should be:

  • Within the use by date
  • Still sealed
  • Packaging intact
  • Stocked to match the number of bodies on site
  • Is water available close to the kit?

You can have what ever you want as long as you justify it with evidence from previous incidents.

Remember no pills, creams or potions.

Water needs to be available at all times so wall kits need to be mounted near or in the same room as a sink and portable kits need a small sealed, sterile water bottle. ‘Still’ water bottles with a sports nozzle are ideal but remember it needs to be sterile and sealed. Also if it is a bottle of water it needs a sticker on saying for First Aid or HSE use only.

As a company we check our first aid kits every Monday and record in each kit a completion list on a monthly checklist. Each week a different member of the team checks the kits as each one has additional items as well as the HSE Minimum to meet that area of use. By doing the rotation on staff checks, all staff get familiar with the kits in that room or area.

Each kit has copies of blank accident forms and Patient report forms as well as the monthly check tick sheet. We also have a monthly treatment spreadsheet for minor injuries where wipes or plasters are used and don’t need a full accident form. On playground duties this spreadsheet will be daily and must be stored in a folder in the office. The only people to access this should be recognized first aiders.

As a busy first aid company we check fixed wall kits weekly and our portable kits daily.

If you have mobile kits used everyday on playground duties then these should be checked daily and a small amount of regular used stock need to held on site. Don’t hoard dressings as they usually only have a short 3 to 4 year shelf life.

If you are a venue that does not have many incidents the minimum really should be monthly.

I have not mentioned the BS8599-1 kits here and will cover this in my next update.

Hope this helps.

Email me on paulkenny@me.com for any information you need.

PK

Incident reporting in schools and Nurseries (accidents, diseases and dangerous occurrences) Update

Accident 14   An ‘accident’ is defined as an unplanned and uncontrolled event that has (or could have) resulted in some sort of harm, The harm may be:

  • an injury (eg a cut or fracture)
  • an illness
  • a mental trauma

Major accidents are defined in the Reporting Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR).

I get a number of questions as to what should and should not be reported after an accident. Hopefully the attached HSE document should help. Make sure you read all the document to fully understand what should and should not be reported.

Always ensure that parents attention is brought to any accident involving a child.

Requirement to inform parents

The Early Years Foundation Stage requires providers, on the child’s admission, to seek parental permission for any necessary emergency medical advice or treatment in the future. Provider must also inform parents of any accidents or injuries sustained by the child while the child is in their care and of any first aid treatment given. It does not give a timescale in which to do this but it is good practice to do this on the same day. This will normally be when the child is collected from the childcare provider. Most providers do this by asking parents to view the record of the accident or injury and to sign to say they have seen it. If you wish to use this type of approach you must also be aware of the data protection rules and not allow parents to view personal information other than that relating to their own child. The requirement to inform parents is more general than that to notify Ofsted and parents should be informed of any accident or injury especially where first aid is necessary. Where a child is picked up by someone other than the child’s parent, with the permission of the parent, we would normally accept that notifying this person is sufficient to satisfy this requirement. You may wish to establish this practice by including it in the information you give to parents. The Childcare Register does not specifically require you to inform parents, but it remains good practice to do so.

‘Serious accidents, injuries and deaths that registered providers must notify to Ofsted and local child protection agencies’ (A childcare fact sheet October 2011).

If accidents do occur they should be investigated to prevent them from happening again. The main points to consider when investigating accidents that have caused injuries or damage are:

  • ensure that accidents, especially serious ones, are reported immediately;
  • ensure any injured people are safe and given appropriate medical or first-aid treatment;
  • seal off the scene of the accident – this stops other people getting hurt and will save any evidence;
  • record the contact details of any witnesses;
  • take photographs or draw a sketch of the accident scene;
  • take witness statements – this should be in writing and done as soon aas possible;
  • find out what caused the accident and why it happened. Don’t just look at what caused the injury or damage, find the ‘root’ cause, ie the first event that occurred in the series of events that led to the injury or damage;
  • decide what you need to do to prevent the same accident happening again, and do it;
  • review the actions you have taken to ensure they are effective
  • make sure the accident form or book is filled in.

Remember an accident report is a legal document and as such should not be shared or given out without having an audit trail for any requests and ideally these should be made in writing. In some instances It might be advisable to check with your insurance company and or your governing body to ensure that they are happy for the information to be given out and shared. Remember you can’t refuse to show or share the information with parents but it is a legal document so therefore it is advisable to ensure you have an audit trail for such information requests.

Handouts.

Serious accidents, injuries and deaths that registered providers must notify to Ofsted and local child protection agencies Schoolaccidents

Stroke patient identification

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Recently I had a student on a course talk about a fourth way to identify a victim of a stroke.  I had never come across this before so i was intrigued. During an emergency phone call the ambulance service asked the caller to ask the stroke victim to stick their tongue out for the family which fell to the left. Although in this instance it helped the family to identify the stroke it is not a universal method of identifying a stroke. I have attached the recognised UK NHS advice with the Internet link. In first aid we are expected to follow set procedures, however little tricks like this used at the same time as the recognised procedures can sometimes help in your diagnosis.

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stroke/pages/introduction.aspx

First Aid Needs Assessment for Schools and Child Care providers

Every workplace in the UK has a to complete a ‘First Aid Needs Assessment’ and should review that document on a regular basis some bi – yearly some yearly.

The assessment can be as long as two pages but most are just one page.

The HSE have recently published case studies to help. I have attached case studies for both Primary and Secondary schools. I have also put the link to the web page here as well.

Remember when ever trips are arranged you must provide your own first aid kits for the trip.

Case Studies

primaryschoolcasestudy

Secondaryschoolcasestudy

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/casestudy9.pdf

After each course I provide I get a number of requests for the First Aid Needs assessment sheets.

There are two files available both PDF documents that you can download and use.

First Aid Needs Assessment for Schools

firstaidneedsassessment12Nursery